Aging News Alert

First Full-Length Draft Plan to Address Alzheimer's Emerges

 

The Department of Health & Human Services releases the first full-length Draft National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease. The plan includes the bold national goal of preventing or treating Alzheimer's disease by 2025, and marks an historic commitment by the federal government to tackling this devastating disease.

"It is Oscar season, and this draft national plan is our award-winning script," says Rep. Edward Markey. The Massachusetts Democrat is founder of the Congressional Task Force on Alzheimer's Disease and House author of the National Alzheimer's Project Act, the law mandating the creation of a national plan on Alzheimer's.

"Now that we have a draft script, we must finance the film," Markey continued. "The deadline of preventing or treating Alzheimer's by 2025 will help set milestones to keep us on track, and Congress must allocate the funds to make the strategies outlined in this plan a reality."

Earlier this month, Markey introduced HR 3891, the proposed Spending Reductions Through Innovations in Therapies (SPRINT) Act, which would spur innovation in research and drug development for high-cost, chronic health conditions such as Alzheimer's.

Markey has long been an active advocate in the continuing campaign to find a cure for Alzheimer's. Last April, for example, he authored the proposed Health Outcomes, Planning & Education (HOPE) Act which was designed to encourage early Alzheimer's diagnoses, as well as connect caregivers to information and resources. In May 2011, Markey and Rep. Chris Smith (R-NJ), who co-chairs the Congressional Taskforce on Alzheimer's Disease, proposed the Alzheimer's Breakthrough Act, which would require the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to create a strategic plan to expedite therapeutic outcomes for those with or at risk of Alzheimer's disease and coordinate Alzheimer's research within the Office of the Director of the National Institutes of Health and across all centers and institutes of the NIH.

Info: To access the draft plan, please go to http://aspe.hhs.gov/daltcp/napa/#DraftNatlPlan 

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