Aging News Alert

Latino Retirement to be Focus of Summit in Washington, April 25

 

Latinos for a Secure Retirement (LSR), a coalition of leading national Latino organizations, on Tuesday (April 17) launched its "Ahorrando Para El Futuro" (i.e., Saving for the Future) campaign to broaden pension access for the more than 50 million Latinos now living in the United States. 

Studies show that Latinos are less likely to have access to a workplace retirement plan than white Americans, and of those who have access, are less likely to participate.  To kick-off the campaign, LSR will hold a summit next (Wednesday, April 25) at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. 

"Latino organizations are awakening to the importance of retirement and savings issues, which are vital to building wealth and, for older Latinos, are crucial to their well-being," says Jeff Cruz, executive director of the LSR coalition.  "We think there's a fruitful match to be made between the financial service industry and Latino workers who want to save smartly for their retirement."

During the upcoming summit, panels will convene on subjects including increasing defined contributions savings, using technology to improve retirement security outcomes, strengthening defined benefit pensions, and turning savings into retirement income. 

Summit attendees will hear from House Democratic Caucus Vice Chair Xavier Becerra (D-CA), Rep. Richard Neal (D-MA), Department of Treasury official Mark Iwry, and other distinguished speakers from Capitol Hill, the U.S. Department of Labor, the Government Accountability Office (GAO), AARP, Prudential, Fidelity, and other organizations and academic institutions.

Info: To learn more, contact Ashley Glacel, e-mail: LatinosForASecureRetirement@gmail.com; phone 703/622-2534; or Paloma Zuleta, e-mail pzuleta@lulac.org; phone 202/365-4553

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